Wednesday, April 06, 2011

Views on Evolution, Intelligent Design Hinge on Death Anxiety | Smart Journalism. Real Solutions. Miller-McCune.

So, our Creationist school board members are anxious?

And 40% of Americans are experiencing enough cognitive dissonance to cause migraines?

It all makes sense.

Views on Evolution, Intelligent Design Hinge on Death Anxiety | Smart Journalism. Real Solutions. Miller-McCune.

It may be the foundation of modern biology, but fewer than 40 percentof Americans say they believe in thetheory of evolution. While frustrated scientists sometimes blame religion for this knowledge gap, newly published research suggests the key factor isn’t faith per se but rather a benefit it provides that Darwin does not: A sense that our all-too-short lives have meaning.

A Canadian study just published in the journal PLoS ONE finds a strong link between existential angst and reluctance to embrace the theory of evolution. A team of researchers led by University of British Columbia psychologist Jessica Tracy report reminders of our mortality apparently inspire antagonism toward this basic scientific precept.

1 comment:

Kevin Scheunemann said...

I'd have angst as well---theory of evolution is just that---a theory. Someone's best guess about what the data means.

Corn ethanol was the same--someone's best guess-- to use food to fuel our cars. Turned out to be a really, really dumb religion creating a bunch of dangerous followers. (Should be renamed, "the religion to starve people so Al Gore can feel like he's doing something about his fanatic warming religion".)

Anytime scientists are looking for faith from the people, that scientists, somehow, got their best guess correct, (corn ethanol, global warming) the scientist's human need to be the people's earth bound deity will go unfullfilled.

The scientific gods will demand why the people don't bring them offerings of university tenure at the alter of the latest unproven theory.

I'm wondering if professors of philosophy operate the same way?